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Native Irish Wildflower Seeds – Plants for Pollinators

5.50

Attract bees, butterflies and other pollinators to your garden with this mix of beautiful Native Irish wildflowers. Contains annual and perennial varieties especially selected to support the All-Ireland Pollinator Plan and are recommended by the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) as good plants for pollinators. Suitable for beds, borders and meadows.

Irish grown seed. Contains: 6 grams to cover 2-4 m2

Annual and perennial varieties.

(2 customer reviews)
  
Description

Attract bees, butterflies and other pollinators to your garden with this mix of beautiful Native Irish wildflower seeds. Contains annual and perennial varieties especially selected to support the All-Ireland Pollinator Plan and are recommended by the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) as good plants for pollinators. Suitable for beds, borders and meadows, or as an alternative to summer bedding flowers.

Our native Irish wildflower seed mix includes

Betony, Birdsfoot Trefoil, Clustered Bellflower, Common Knapweed, Common St. John’s Wort, Common Toadflax, Corn Chamomile, Corn Cockle, Corn Flower, Corn Marigold, Corn Poppy, Dark Mullein, Devils bit Scabious, Field Scabious, Greater Knapweed, Hedge Woundwort, Kidney vetch, Lady’s Bedstraw, Meadow Cranesbill, Meadow Vetchling, Nettle Leaved Bellflower, Purple Loosestrife, Self Heal, Small Scabious, Tufted Vetch, Viper’s Bugloss, Wild Carrot, Wild Marjoram, Wild Red Clover, Yarrow, and Yellow Rattle

  • Irish grown seed.
  • Contains: 6 grams to cover 2-4 m2
  • Standard seeds. EC rules and standards.
To prepare soil for planting

First clear the site of weeds, stones and sticks. Turn the soil and break up any clods, then rake so that you have a fine crumbly surface. If your ground is heavy, or you do not want to or can’t turn the soil, then clear of weeds and add a 2-3 layer of sand, soil or compost, or a mix of these, to the surface. Rake over. Do not add fertilizer to meadows or flowerbeds. For more sowing and maintenance tips, read the sowing instructions below.

Plants for pollinators

The types of plants and flowers we plant have a huge impact on the wildlife around us, including bees and other insects as well as birds and small mammals. If you would like to further explore plants and their importance for bees, please visit our blog and immerse yourself in the subject. Here are some of the blogs I have written about plants and bees:

Plants for Bees Winter – Hanna’s Bees (hannasbees.ie)

Pollen – benefits for bees & humans – Hanna’s Bees (hannasbees.ie)

Sowing instructions

Sowing instructions

Sowing instructions:

Sow directly into prepared soil in March – June or August – October.
Grows best in full sun.
Flowers May-September/October.
Coverage is 1.5-3 grams/square meter.

To prepare soil for planting, first clear the site of weeds, stones and sticks. Turn the soil and break up any clods, then rake so that you have a fine crumbly surface. If your ground is heavy, or you do not want to or can’t turn the soil, then clear of weeds and add a 2-3 layer of sand, soil or compost, or a mix of these, to the surface. Rake over. Do not add fertilizer to meadows or flowerbeds.

Sowing: Sow seed in March – June or August – October. Seeds sown in spring will flower the same year, and seed sown in autumn will flower the next year.  Because the seed mix contains seeds of different weight and size, gently shake the seed packet before sowing to mix the seed. You can also add a bit of sand or compost to the seed before sowing to make sure the seeds are evenly distributed when sowing. Spread the seed thinly, 1.5 – 3 g/square meter.

Germination: Wildflower seeds need light to germinate, so there is no need to rake in the seeds after sowing. Roll or firm the soil by tapping the back of the rake on the ground. This makes sure the seed is in contact with the soil. Make sure the soil is moist to speed up germination.

The seeds may take a few weeks to germinate so make sure the soil does not dry out. Germination will be slower if the conditions are dry or cold. Seeds sown in autumn may therefore not germinate until the following spring. Some seeds also need a cold spell to germinate, which is why some annual flowers sown late in spring may not germinate and flower until the following summer.

If birds are digging up and eating the seed after sowing, you can rake in the seed slightly or cover them with a thin layer of sand or compost. Alternatively, cover with a garden net or horticultural fleece until they have germinated or use a scarecrow.

Flowering: Flowers May-September/October.

After flowering: This flower mix contains seeds of perennial plants, which will flower year after year, and annual plants, which will self-seed in the autumn if the seedheads are not removed after flowering. To ensure that the annual plants self seed you can either leave the seedheads on the plants after flowering, or you can cut them down. Once cut down, leave the plant parts including the seed heads on the ground. The stalks and leaves will decompose and enrich the soil and the seeds will overwinter and germinate the following spring. Make sure to dig up any unwelcome weeds so that they do not take over your wildflower patch.

Reviews 2
  1. linda barry (verified owner)

    love mix and great as a gift

  2. Suzanne Power (verified owner)

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